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Pulse Shooting Memorial

Gay Hispanics: Miami Herald Stumbles in Spinoff Story re Orlando Shootings

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After gay rights, gun control and (more gingerly) Islamic terrorism, coverage of the mass shooting in Orlando gets subdivided in a weekend story in The Miami Herald, which examines the atrocity from the standpoint of gay Hispanics.

It’s an interesting angle – especially in Florida, the port of entry for many from Central and Latin America – but it has some flaws. For one, it misses some religious “ghosts.” The article brings up the topic of religion, then bounces off. Instead, it emphasizes twin themes:

Some want to make sure one fact is not forgotten: The vast majority of victims were Hispanics.

“This was not just an LGBT community,” said Zoe Colon, director of Florida and southeast operations for the Hispanic Federation. “This was a Latino LGBT community.”

Not that the tragedy doesn’t call for a sensitive treatment. The newspaper appropriately tells the reactions of Orlando resident Edwin Lopez as he learned that 12 of the 49 people killed in the Pulse nightclub were personal friends.

Then the story launches rather blithely into a connection with a more general issue:

A difficult conversation has started about the struggle of being an LGBT person of color. For many Hispanics, a traditionally Christian culture laced with machismo and traditional gender roles could foster fear of rejection from one’s own family. That fear can prevent young people from coming out to their loved ones.

“You don’t want to be judged by your family. Those are the only people who have really been supportive of you your entire life,” said Dominique Sanchez. The 19-year-old said she’s known people close to her who are reluctant to be open about their sexuality. “Your friends come and go. So if [your family doesn’t] accept you, then you don’t accept yourself…”

Read full article at GetReligion.org



 

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