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Afghan National Police

An Afghan National Police officer holds up an Afghan boy in Keshem, Afghanistan, February of 2009.

Obama Policy Defends ‘Boy Play’ in Afghanistan; U.S. Troops Punished

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Apparently, this is what “Hope and Change” looks like:

Rampant sexual abuse of children has long been a problem in Afghanistan, particularly among armed commanders who dominate much of the rural landscape and can bully the population. The practice is called bacha bazi, literally “boy play,” and American soldiers and Marines have been instructed not to intervene — in some cases, not even when their Afghan allies have abused boys on military bases, according to interviews and court records.

The policy has endured as American forces have recruited and organized Afghan militias to help hold territory against the Taliban. But soldiers and Marines have been increasingly troubled that instead of weeding out pedophiles, the American military was arming them in some cases and placing them as the commanders of villages — and doing little when they began abusing children.

“The reason we were here is because we heard the terrible things the Taliban were doing to people, how they were taking away human rights,” said Dan Quinn, a former Special Forces captain who beat up an American-backed militia commander for keeping a boy chained to his bed as a sex slave. “But we were putting people into power who would do things that were worse than the Taliban did — that was something village elders voiced to me.”

The policy of instructing soldiers to ignore child sexual abuse by their Afghan allies is coming under new scrutiny, particularly as it emerges that service members like Captain Quinn have faced discipline, even career ruin, for disobeying it.

After the beating, the Army relieved Captain Quinn of his command and pulled him from Afghanistan. He has since left the military.

Four years later, the Army is also trying to forcibly retire Sgt. First Class Charles Martland, a Special Forces member who joined Captain Quinn in beating up the commander.

“The Army contends that Martland and others should have looked the other way (a contention that I believe is nonsense),” Representative Duncan Hunter, a California Republican who hopes to save Sergeant Martland’s career, wrote last week to the Pentagon’s inspector general. . . .

When asked about American military policy, the spokesman for the American command in Afghanistan, Col. Brian Tribus, wrote in an email: “Generally, allegations of child sexual abuse by Afghan military or police personnel would be a matter of domestic Afghan criminal law.” He added that “there would be no express requirement that U.S. military personnel in Afghanistan report it.”

(Hat-tip: Jamie Weinstein on Twitter.) Let’s begin by praising the New York Times for actually reporting this story, a rare exception to their usual see-no-evil approach to the Obama administration’s policy failures. But also notice the rest of the media, while finding time to jump on Ben Carson for criticizing Islam, is not asking Democrats about this horrific policy of arming gay Muslim pedophiles at U.S. taxpayer expense, and punishing American troops who don’t like it.

https://twitter.com/rsmccain/status/645976011566411776?ref_src=twsrc^tfw

First published at TheOtherMcCain.com



 

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