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Feminist Hero Simone de Beauvoir, Pervert

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One of the things they don’t teach in Women’s Studies classes is that pioneering feminist author Simone de Beauvoir was a pervert who was fired from a teaching job for seducing teenage girls:

In 1943, Simone de Beauvoir was fired for behavior leading to the corruption of a minor.

Once again, the apologists of de Beauvoir might rush to say that the 1943 moment was a singular incident . . . But nothing could be further from the truth.

De Beauvoir’s sexual interest for children is a theme spreading throughout her life. She was amongst the first philosophers who tried to unite the genre that had begun in the 1930s (and that lasted until 1980s in Western Europe) of female pedagogical pedophilia. She attempted this unification with her essay “Brigitte Bardot and the Lolita Syndrome,” published for the first time in Esquire magazine in 1959 and then republished multiple times until the mid-1970s. . . .

The 1959 essay was just the beginning. In 1977, de Beauvoir, alongside most of the Marxist French intelligentsia, signed a petition demanding nothing more and nothing less than the legalization of pedophilia and the immediate release of three individuals who were due to serve long jail sentences for sexually exploiting several boys and girls aged 11 to 14. . . .

The 1977 petition triggered an entire discussion at the societal level in France about the laws concerning age of consent, a discussion in which the abolitionist camp (of which de Beauvoir and her lover were part of) united into Front de libération des Pédophiles (FLIP — the Pedophiles Liberation Front) and the intentions of the members of FLIP were explained quite clearly by themselves in the discussion broadcasted on the radio in April 1978 by Radio France Culture. . . .

All these make de Beauvoir not just a pedophile apologist but an active supporter. However, what makes her an abuser is her activity through which she was recruiting pupils, abusing them, and then passing them to Jean-Paul Sartre, sometimes separately, sometimes in an integrated ménage à trois. The Telegraph writes in a review of Carole Seymour-Jones’s book, Simone de Beauvoir? Meet Jean-Paul Sartre, a book meant to analyze de Beauvoir’s relationship with Sartre, the following:

For long periods, the couple became a “trio”, though the arrangement rarely worked out well for the third party: at least two of de Beauvoir’s former pupils found themselves becoming first her lover, then Sartre’s, only for the couple to close ranks against them once the fun wore off. . . .

For Seymour-Jones, de Beauvoir’s affairs with her students were not lesbian but paedophiliac in origin: she was “grooming” them for Sartre, a form of “child abuse”.

For de Beauvoir (as well as for Sartre), age didn’t matter as long as the partners were younger than her and Sartre. The possibility that others might get hurt or sexually exploited wasn’t even remotely on the eminent feminist’s radar, who thought that “grooming” girls in order for Sartre to take their virginity (Sartre’s words, not ours) was in and of itself an act of sexual empowerment for those girls.

You can read the whole thing at A Voice for Men. It was written by a Romanian writer, Lucian Valsan, who remarks:

A while ago, a group of coffee-shop feminists were trying to convince me that feminism is not as bad as I say it is and that if I just read more about feminism, I would eventually understand. . . . Of course, those feminists were unable to fathom that someone had taken their ideology seriously enough to read its literature and then rationally end up utterly rejecting it. As with any other cult, such a thing is inconceivable for the true believers of the sect.

Indeed. I know exactly what he means. Readers may be interested in Carole Seymour-Jones’ book, A Dangerous Liaison, as well as Bianca Lamblin’s memoir, A Disgraceful Affair:

It is the story of Bianca Bienenfeld, a 17-year-old student who was seduced by her philosophy professor, de Beauvoir, and then passed on to de Beauvoir’s partner/lover Sartre. The three lived in a menage ‘a trois between 1939 and 1940, when the relationship ended and the teenager was abandoned.

Probably won’t find those books in your Women’s Studies syllabus.

First published at TheOtherMcCain.com



 

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