Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

130115130215-harvey-milk-inauguration-jan-1978-with-constituent-children-story-top

White House to hold event unveiling postage stamp commemorating child sexual predator Harvey Milk

By Kirsten Anderson

Ben Johnson contributed to this story.

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 19, 2014 (LifeSiteNews.com) – President Obama’s White House will host a dedication ceremony for a new U.S. postage stamp commemorating Harvey Milk, the infamous homosexual activist who became the first openly gay elected official in California in 1977. However, friends and foes alike say Milk was more than an elected official – he was also a child sexual predator whose partners had a habit of killing themselves.

The predatory nature of Milk’s personal relationships led at least two of his young sexual partners to commit suicide – one of them Jack Galen McKinley, a 16-year-old runaway from Maryland.

A biography about Milk written by his close friend and fellow homosexual Randy Shilts states that, in addition to the 16-year-old runaway, Milk had other relationships with underage boys, as well, indicating that Milk was a statutory rapist.

Jack Lira, a 25-year-old alcoholic, also killed himself after his relationship with Milk went sour.

Milk was attracted to “boyish-looking men in their late teens and early 20s,” Shilts wrote, adding that “Harvey always had a penchant for young waifs with substance-abuse problems.”

Matt Barber of Liberty Counsel Action, who is himself the father of a teenage boy, objected strongly to the stamp honoring Milk.

“While most sexual predators get time in prison and a dishonorable mention on the registry of sex offenders, Harvey Milk got his own California state holiday (‘Harvey Milk Day’) and, more recently, his own commemorative postage stamp, awarded by the Obama administration’s USPS,” Barber said. “To me, even the mere notion of elevating, to hero status, a man who statutorily raped teenage boys, is…uncivil.”

In an announcement heralding the event, postal officials called him “a visionary leader who became one of the first openly gay elected officials in the U.S. when he won a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977.”

Read more: LifeSiteNews



 

Posting Policy

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.

Trending Now on BarbWire.com

Send this to a friend